International Women’s Day!

The Tyler Libraries are celebrating National Women’s History Month the entire month of March, but today is International Women’s Day!  The theme for this year is #beboldforchange. Organizers are asking people all over the world to,  “help forge a better working world – a more gender inclusive world.”

To learn more about March 8th and National Women’s History Month, please visit the following resources:

Stop by either campus library to learn more about the women who changed our history, culture, and society to benefit women’s rights around the world!

A Shining Thread of HopeA Shining Thread of Hope: The History of Black Women in America by Darlene Clark Hine and Kathleen Thompson

Available at the Midlothian Campus Library Circulating Collection E185.86 .H68 1999

From Goodreads.com: 

At the greatest moments and in the cruelest times, black women have been a crucial part of America’s history.  Now, the inspiring history of black women in America is explored in vivid detail by two leaders in the fields of African American and women’s history.

A Shining Thread of Hope chronicles the lives of black women from indentured servitude in the early American colonies to the cruelty of antebellum plantations, from the reign of lynch law in the Jim Crow South to the triumphs of the Civil Rights era, and it illustrates how the story of black women in America is as much a tale of courage and hope as it is a history of struggle.  On both an individual and a collective level, A Shining Thread of Hope reveals the strength and spirit of black women and brings their stories from the fringes of American history to a central position in our understanding of the forces and events that have shaped this country.

Pretty Good for a GirlPretty Good for a Girl: Women in Bluegrass by Murphy Hicks Henry

Available at the Midlothian Campus Library Circulating Collection ML394 .H457 2013

From Goodreads.com:

The first book devoted entirely to women in bluegrass, Pretty Good for a Girl documents the lives of more than seventy women whose vibrant contributions to the development of bluegrass have been, for the most part, overlooked. Accessibly written and organized by decade, the book begins with Sally Ann Forrester, who played accordion and sang with Bill Monroe’s Blue Grass Boys from 1943 to 1946, and continues into the present with artists such as Alison Krauss, Rhonda Vincent, and the Dixie Chicks. Drawing from extensive interviews, well-known banjoist Murphy Hicks Henry gives voice to women performers and innovators throughout bluegrass’s history, including such pioneers as Bessie Lee Mauldin, Wilma Lee Cooper, and Roni and Donna Stoneman; family bands including the Lewises, Whites, and McLains; and later pathbreaking performers such as the Buffalo Gals and other all-girl bands, Laurie Lewis, Lynn Morris, Missy Raines, and many others.

Not Pretty EnoughNot Pretty Enough: The Unlikely Triumph of Helen Gurley Brown

Available at the Midlothian Campus Library Circulating Collection PN 4874.B768 H57 2016

When Helen Gurley Brown published Sex and the Single Girl in 1962, it sold more than two million copies in just three weeks, presaging the self-help boom and helping to usher in the unapologetic self-affirmation of second wave feminism. Brown declared that it was okay, even imperative, to enjoy sex outside of marriage; that equal rights for women should extend to the bedroom; that meaningful work outside the home was essential for a woman’s security and self-esteem. The book catapulted Brown into national renown, cementing her status as a complex and divisive feminist personality. And the ripple effects of her outspokenness about sex and her emphasis on friendships between women can still be seen today, on TV shows like Sex and the City and Girls, and in the magazine world as well. When she died in 2012, her obituary appeared on the front page of The New York Times, which noted that “the look of women’s magazines today . . . is due in no small part to her influence.” She may not always have been loved–but she was always talked about.

Brown’s life story–a classic American rags-to-riches tale–is just as juicy as her controversial books. In this wonderful new biography, the writer and reporter Gerri Hirshey traces Brown’s path from deep in the Arkansas Ozarks to her wild single years in Los Angeles, from the New York magazine world to her Hollywood adventures with her film producer husband. Along the way she became the highest-paid female ad copywriter on the West Coast, and transformed Hearst’s failing literary magazine, Cosmopolitan, into the female-oriented global juggernaut it is today. Full of firsthand accounts of Brown from some of her closest friends, including Liz Smith, Gloria Vanderbilt, Barbara Walters, and more, as well as those whose paths she brushed–her 1939 prom date, a sorority sister from business school, Cosmo cover girls like Beverly Johnson and Brooke Shields–and writing from the woman herself, Not Pretty Enough is a vital biography that shines new light on the life of one of the most incomparable and indelible women of the twentieth century.

The Geek Feminist RevolutionThe Geek Feminist Revolution by Kameron Hurley

Available at the Midlothian Campus Library Circulating Collection PS 3608.U769 A6 2016

From Goodreads.com:

A powerful collection of essays on feminism, geek culture, and a writer’s journey, from one of the most important new voices in genre.

The Geek Feminist Revolution is a collection of essays by double Hugo Award-winning essayist and science fiction and fantasy novelist Kameron Hurley.

The book collects dozens of Hurley’s essays on feminism, geek culture, and her experiences and insights as a genre writer, including “We Have Always Fought,” which won the 2014 Hugo for Best Related Work. The Geek Feminist Revolution will also feature several entirely new essays written specifically for this volume.

Unapologetically outspoken, Hurley has contributed essays to The Atlantic, Locus, Tor.com, and elsewhere on the rise of women in genre, her passion for SF/F, and the diversification of publishing.

When Women WinWhen Women Win: Emily’s List and the Rise of Women in American Politics by Ellen R. Malcolm

Available at the Midlothian Campus Library Circulating Collection HQ 1391.U5 M35 2016

From Goodreads.com:

In 1985, aware of the near-total absence of women in Congress, Ellen R. Malcolm launched EMILY’s List, a powerhouse political organization that seeks to ignite change by getting women elected to office. The rest is riveting history: Between 1986 — when there were only 12 Democratic women in the House and none in the Senate — and now, EMILY’s List has helped elect 19 women Senators, 11 governors, and 110 Democratic women to the House.    Incorporating exclusive interviews with Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi, Tammy Baldwin, and others, When Women Win delivers stories of some of the toughest political contests of the past three decades, including the historic victory of Barbara Mikulski as the first Democratic woman elected to the Senate in her own right; the defeat of Todd Akin (“legitimate rape”) by Claire McCaskill; and Elizabeth Warren’s dramatic win over incumbent Massachusetts senator Scott Brown.
When Women Win includes Malcolm’s own story — the high drama of Anita Hill’s sexual harassment testimony against Clarence Thomas and its explosive effects on women’s engagement in electoral politics; the long nights spent watching the polls after months of dogged campaigning; the heartbreaking losses and unprecedented victories — but it’s also a page-turning political saga that may well lead up to the election of the first woman president of the United States.

 

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