And the word is: GIF

Each November since 2005 lexicographers (“n., a writer or compiler of a dictionary”) at Oxford English Dictionary announce the word that qualifies as word of the year. After watching word trends to determine what word best illustrates the current zeitgeist, the 2012 winner is GIF. You probably recognize GIF—an acronym standing for graphic interchange format—after all it has been around for over 25 years, but like the word “Google” before it, GIF is morphing from strictly a noun into a verb. From popular tumblr sites such as That Disney GIF to gymnastic GIFs…continue reading →

Great Debate!

Three debates down and two weeks before the election: are you more confused than ever? For an historical view of presidential debates have a look at these video clips from the library database, Films on Demand. The 1960 debate between John Kennedy and Richard Nixon is often cited as a turning point in that year’s election. For the first time the debate was televised, a huge advantage for the tanned, telegenic Kennedy. Even in this clip, Nixon, recovering from the flu, appears pale and awkward—not a quality voters look for in a president.…continue reading →

How’s your Golgi apparatus?

Are life sciences getting you down? The library has resources to help you study and learn. Some resources may be just a click away. On the web you can find: Scritable, a web site developed by Nature magazine with information on cell biology, genetics, and other life sciences. DavidRothman.net with links to medical illustrations. Innerbody.com for easy to understand, colorful anatomy illustrations. Study stack for flash cards in biology and many other subjects. Try the stack at the end of this post to test your knowledge of cell biology. Click the card for…continue reading →

Flashback Friday: Vintage Library Posters from the Work Projects Administration

While library services have been changed with technology through the years, our mission remains the same, to provide communities with a space to convene, discuss, educate, challenge, and enlighten. Don't believe us? In today's Flashback Friday, one of a three part series, we explore government funded artwork for libraries across the United States. We start with these charming and eccentric Great Depression era silkscreen posters. Created by artists working in the Work Projects Administration between 1936 and 1943, most of these posters wouldn't feel out of place in a library today. The Work…continue reading →

Library Workshops!

Time to brush up on your research skills and maybe get a little SDV credit! Learn how to cite with confidence, evaluate web results and take a look at the new library catalog. Join us for some awesome workshops! Midlothian Schedule Tuesday, 10/9 2:30-3:30PM “Is This Any Good? Evaluating Library Research” Thursday, 10/11 6:30-7:30PM “Tyler Tips: Research Databases Like a Pro” Friday, 10/12 11:00-12:00PM “Who Said That? The Basics of Citing Sources In APA and MLA” Monday, 10/15 10:00-11:00AM “Tyler Tips: Research Databases Like a Pro” Tuesday, 10/16 5:15-6:15PM “Who Said That? The…continue reading →

Election 2012

Hmmm. . . Obama or Romney? Who to choose, who to choose. . .         Are you wondering who should get your vote on November 6? Try this quiz from USA Today. After answering 14 questions on issues ranging from Medicare to Afghanistan to gay marriage and rating the importance of each issue to you, you will see how closely your opinions match the two candidates, Barack Obama or Mitt Romney.  Then you can enter the voting booth knowing which candidate agrees with you! Still confused? Maybe you don’t know…continue reading →

That’s Delicious!

The John Tyler Libraries have complied a great collection of links to websites handy for students and researchers. Whether you are looking for citation help (Purdue OWL) or information on different countries (CIA World Factbook) or something else these links can save you time searching the web. They can be found by clicking the Delicious icon on our webpage (right beside the WordPress link!). Here are some additional links you might enjoy: ArtCyclopedia Thousands of links to images and articles about artists and their works. Bio-Web “Your source for Molecular and Cell Biology-Bioinformatics-Technology…continue reading →

Medal Math

Have you been parked in front of the TV gorging on Olympic coverage? Here is a new, statistical way of enjoying this sporting spectacle. With 195 countries on planet Earth (CIA World Factbook) and 205 of them competing in the Summer Olympics (BBC) what country is the most successful? There are over 10,000 athletes competing in over 300 events, so it depends on how you define success. As of this writing China and the USA are tied for total medals at 17 each. But leading with 9, China has 2 more gold medals…continue reading →

Woody Guthrie at 100

From California to the New York Island and beyond music lovers are noting the 100th anniversary of the birth of American singer and songwriter Woody Guthrie. From his beginnings in Oklahoma until his death from the incurable degenerative neurological disorder Huntington’s Disease in 1967 Guthrie was noted for not only his prolific songwriting but also his support of laborers and farm workers in particular. Like his contemporary John Steinbeck, Guthrie bore witness to the Dustbowl migration of Oklahoma farmers (Okies) to the fertile fields of California and to the prejudice the Okies suffered.…continue reading →

Old Newspapers

Want to travel to the past? You can by reading a century-old issue of the Richmond Times-Dispatch. Without leaving your home you can view issues from 1903-1913 through the Library of Congress’s Chronicling America project. The database includes papers published between 1836 and 1922 throughout the U.S. And just to illustrate how history sometimes repeats itself, check out the July 11, 1912 edition of the TD. It includes a story of the bitter resignation of a university president who clashes with the Board of Visitors. This time the conflict was at Virginia Tech.…continue reading →