Fiction Friday: Oleander Girl

Orphaned Korobi Roy leads a sheltered life in Kolkata, India under the care of her doting grandparents. When she meets the handsome and charming Rajat Bose, the only son of prosperous business family, the two fall in love and become engaged. End of story? Not quite. Unexpectedly Korobi’s grandfather dies shortly after the formal engagement ceremony unleashing a cascade of life-changing events. Korobi’s grandmother reveals her knowledge of Korobi’s parents—that Korobi’s father may still be alive and living in the U.S. Part mystery, part coming-of-age story Oleander Girl follows Korobi’s search for her…continue reading →

Fiction Friday: The Light Between Oceans

Tom Sherbourne and his wife Isabel live on Janus Rock, an island situated at the southwest corner of Australia. Tom keeps the lighthouse there protecting the sailors who navigate the treacherous waters between oceans—the warm, calm Indian Ocean and the cold, stormy Great Southern Ocean at the bottom of the world. Tom has survived childhood mistreatment and the horrors of World War I. The routine and solitude of lighthouse keeping suit him perfectly. When he is joined by his wife, the beautiful and effervescent Isabel, he is content. Isabel, however, longs for children.…continue reading →

Fiction Friday: The Ashford Affair

Opening in Kenya in 1926 and moving from pre-World War I England to 1999 New York and back again, The Ashford Affair chronicles the life of popular debutante Lady Beatrice (Bea) Gillecote, her cousin, Addie, their loves and their offspring. Bea becomes her six-year-old cousin’s protector and champion when Addie is sent to live with her titled uncle and imperious aunt after the untimely death of her parents.  Just a year older, Bea has the grace and confidence Addie lacks. When the two make their entrance into society, Bea is dubbed Debutante of…continue reading →

Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal

Caution: if you are like me and like to read while you are eating this may not be the book for you. Mary Roach obviously likes science. In her previous books she explores space travel (Packing for Mars), sex and reproduction (Bonk), and death (Stiff). In this latest book, Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal she tackles digestion from beginning to end. As in her earlier works her research is fascinating and her delivery is hilarious. If you can get past the yuck factor you will be in for an entertaining and enlightening…continue reading →

Listen to This!

Whew! After a week of dystopia it is time for the Dangerous Library Book Pushers to feature some (possibly) lighter reading fare. In fact, these suggestions are so light you won’t even have to pick them up! What I have in mind are e-audiobooks. What could be better for long car trips to vacation destinations or even short hops between work and home? With your MyTyler log-in and password you can choose from over 1,000 e-audiobook titles as well as music and videos. Your log-in will allow you to check-out up to 4…continue reading →

Dystopia Week Saturday

The Dog Stars by Peter Heller Unlike the rest of this week’s posts today’s book, The Dog Stars, has a grown-up appeal; it features an adult male protagonist. Plus, unlike the books previously presented this week there is no oppressive government presence. In fact there is no government at all, no societal divisions, no lurking rebellious factions just a few lost souls after a world-wide influenza epidemic. Two things captured me about The Dog Stars: First it is sort of a survival manual for a post-apocalyptic world. Second the main character, Hig, is…continue reading →

Dystopia Week Friday

Escape from Furnace by Alexander Gordon Smith One of the first rules about book talking is: Do not try to booktalk a book you haven’t read! And here I go violating that very rule. But in my defense one of the reasons I haven’t read Escape From Furnace is from the time the library received the book in October it has been checked out to one of its many fans. That tells you how popular this book and this series is. The library acquired Lockdown and its sequels based on a student suggestion.…continue reading →

Dystopia Week Thursday

Delirium by Lauren Oliver As in yesterday’s book, Matched, the government has determined that love is something to be avoided. In fact, this dystopia considers love a disease—a delirium. Accordingly, when you reach a certain age you must have The Procedure which will make you immune to love. Lena is looking forward to having The Procedure but 95 days before it is scheduled she meets Alex. Lena’s family struggles. She lives with her aunt and cousins and there is a cloud over the household. Lena’s mother, despite having The Procedure multiple times was…continue reading →

Dystopia Week Wednesday

Matched by Ally Condie In the Society all your life choices are made for you: what job you do, the place you live, what belongings you may have and who you marry. If the authorities can control these aspects of your life then the rest of the country can be controlled as well. The story opens with the night of Cassia’s matching ceremony. She, with all other 17-year-old girls, is patiently waiting her turn to see her match displayed on the giant screen in the banquet room. But when her name is called…continue reading →

Dystopia Week Tuesday

Divergent by Veronica Roth Here’s the setting: Chicago sometime in the future. As in The Hunger Games, society has evolved  into a new arrangement of the population. At 16 years old you choose the faction of society you feel best suits your character—the brave, the peaceful, the honest, etc. Each part has a different role to play. Although her family belongs to Abnegation (the selfless) Tris chooses to join Dauntless (the brave), those responsible for protecting their fellow citizens but who Tris’s father calls “hellions.” Tris, like Katniss in The Hunger Games, shows…continue reading →