The Icing on the Cake: true stories from StoryCorps

Ever wondered what stories your family might have to tell? StoryCorps helps America listen and remember. In less than a decade, StoryCorps has recorded and preserved over 30,000 interviews; children interviewing parents, husbands telling romantic stories about their wives. All of the interviews are stored at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. In "The Icing on the Cake" Connie Alvarez interviews her mother Blanca Alvarez about coming to America. Blanca tells of how she and her husband struggled to support themselves and their family. Daughter Connie looks back and finds…continue reading →

Anatomy and Physiology via web: Google Body

Can't get to the library to study with the box of bones? Need a quick skull refresher before your final? Try Google Body! With Google Body you can: View and move detailed model of the human body in 3D See systems individually or together Add or subtract labels Search for organs, bones, muscles and more Share the exact view with other students with the exact URL Google Body only works with Google Chrome, Firefox 4 Beta, or other browsers that support WebGL. (Chrome and Firefox 4 are both free downloads.) Study Anatomy in a…continue reading →

Black History Month: Golden Age of Jazz

Experience the Golden Age of Jazz as if you were there! Photographer William P. Gottlieb passed his collection of 1,600+ photographs of jazz musicians--most taken between 1938-1948--into the public domain. The Library of Congress curates the collection and has made them available online through Flickr. Over and over, Gottlieb captures the essential personality of the musician. See big names--Billie Holiday, Dizzy Gillespie, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Thelonious Monk, Ella Fitzgerald--up close and personal. Gottlieb's respect for the music and musician shines; he was an early jazz fan and had the first newspaper column on jazz. Take a moment and travel back in time! More…continue reading →

Choose Privacy Week: May 2-8

Intellectual freedom is not only the right to read what you like, to say what you like, and to protest what you like. Intellectual freedom is also the freedom to read, search, and learn in the digital age…without Big Brother watching over your shoulder. Or at least, not watching without your permission. The American Library Association has declared the first week in May to be Choose Privacy Week. The ALA wants to begin a national conversation about privacy rights in the digital age.  How much of your identity and privacy are you giving…continue reading →